Institute for Urban and Minority Education
Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College
Columbia University

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Recapping the 2nd Annual Edmund Gordon Lecture

In collaboration with the Program in History and Education at Teachers College as well as the Center on History and Education, IUME wass excited to highlight the "Educating Harlem" lecture series in 2014-2015, which is part of a larger initiative to better explore the forces that shaped education in Harlem. Esteemed scholar, Dr. Vanessa Siddle Walker, kicked off this year's lecture series at the 2nd Annual Edmund Gordon Lecture. Make sure to check out our Photo Gallery for pictures from this event!

The lecture concluded the Educating Harlem public conference, which was being held prior, with the goal of discussing the history of education in Harlem by bringing together leading voices in the history of education field. For more information about the Educating Harlem conference, click here.

Learn More About IUME's Literacy Teachers Initiative (LTI) Project

 IUME was excited to announce the launch of the Literacy Teachers Initiative (LTI) Project in spring, 2012. Since then, we have partnered with dynamic elementary and middle school teachers from Harlem and Brooklyn in an effort to collaboratively work toward finding increased pedagogical methods for students. The LTI Project is led by Dr. Jodene Morrell of Teachers College. We have grown in number and ideas each year, received competitive research grants, presented at Teachers College and state, national, and international conferences, and written for publication.

Check out our LTI page for more information and check out the biographies of the Teacher Fellows here!

Welcome to our newest IUME Postdoctoral and Faculty Fellows!

We are excited to welcome our newest group of accomplished and innovative IUME Fellows who will be working with us this year. Our IUME Faculty Fellows include Dr. Brian Lozenski, from Metropolitan State University, and Deron Wallace, from the University of Cambridge. In addition, Teachers College's Minority Postdoctoral Fellow, Dr. Monique Lane, from the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), will also be be a part of IUME research this year.

Learn more about them on our Faculty Fellow page and Postdoctoral Fellow page.


A Historic Evening at the Inaugural Edmund Gordon Lecture

On October 10th, 2013, IUME, in co-sponsorship with the Program in History and Education, hosted Professor Charles M. Payne who delivered the Inaugural Edmund Gordon Address at Teachers College in honor of IUME Founder and legendary figure Dr. Edmund Gordon. The address entitled, “Whatever Happened to the Negro Question? Educational Discourse and the Lost Question of Race”, drew a standing-room-only audience of nearly 200 to Milbank Chapel and helped illustrate how historical understanding is crucial for thinking about contemporary school improvement. In his address, Dr. Payne presented a broad critique of the educational community’s modern perceptions and attitudes towards school achievement, poverty, and race.

Click here to view the lecture on the IUME YouTube channel and here for pictures.

Learn More about the Youth Historians in Harlem Program!

The Youth Historians in Harlem (YHH) project, sponsored by IUME, is a new critical approach to teaching history in urban schools in Harlem, focusing on empowering minority youth through their own cultural experiences, involving students in the practice of "doing" history through guided projects, programs, and participatory action research. YHH seeks to increase students' interest in history through innovative and engaging pedagogical approaches that help them become historians, researching the rich historical past of ‘their’ Harlem community. While YHIH seeks to advance the historical knowledge of education in Harlem, above all, our project seeks to make history relevant to urban students and help increase academic achievement. To learn more about this exciting project, visit the official website here.

Subcribe to the new IUME Newsletter!

In 2013-2104, IUME redesigned its monthly newsletter in a way that not only increases dissemination, but most importantly, better shares all the events and news with the world. The newsletter is available in PDF format, but also available via hard copy at the IUME office at Teachers College. Make sure to subscribe to the newsletter and e-mail list on the bottom right-hand side of this IUME homepage.

For more information and to download/view past IUME newsletters, click here.

Subscribe to our IUME YouTube Channel!

Have you visited the official IUME YouTube page recently? Want to learn more about IUME? Make sure to stop by our YouTube page here and watch a few of our videos and subscribe!. Not only do we keep a collection of IUME events and Colloquia, but our video team prepares short clips on critical research. The most recent Beyond Bullying presentation is now available, as is our December Colloquium and other great clips that should be shared!

In our increasingly digital and mutlimodal era, we believe strongly in collaborative educational content, so make sure to check back often and subscribe to your channel.

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Community > Faculty Fellows

Faculty Fellows

Each year, IUME invites select scholars to join the Institute as a "Faculty Fellow" who act as a liaison and partnering academic in our journey towards social justice. In collaboration with Teachers College and IUME, each present a Colloquia that critically engages the community. We are humbled to announce this year's IUME Faculty Fellows below:

2014-2015 IUME Faculty Fellows

Dr. Brian Lozenski

Brian D. Lozenski is an assistant professor in the School of Urban Education at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minnesota. He received his master’s degree in Urban Education from the University of Pennsylvania, and his doctorate from the University of Minnesota where he studied the cultural contexts of teaching and learning in the department of Curriculum and Instruction. His research explores the intersections of critical participatory action research, Africana Studies, and cultural relevance in the education of youth of African descent. Prior to pursuing his Ph.D., Dr. Lozenski taught mathematics for over a decade in Philadelphia, PA and St. Paul, MN. As a teacher educator and researcher he has worked with other educators, parents, schools, and districts to develop perspectives and strategies that aspire toward social justice while illuminating the historical realities that have created current educational disparities. 

Dr. Lozenski holds deep commitments to a community-engaged research framework where academic researchers follow the lead of community members and organizations to identify prevalent issues that can be addressed through an inquiry-based approach. He co-convened the first ever “What Went Wrong?: Reflecting and Learning from Community-Engaged Research” conference in 2014 where researchers from various communities and the academy analyzed the challenges of establishing reciprocal research partnerships. Dr. Lozenski also coordinates the Uhuru Youth Scholars program where high school youth gain college credit by conducting participatory action research through the lens of African knowledge systems. He co-created this partnership between multiple post-secondary institutions in the Twin Cities and a community-based family education center called the Network for the Development of Children of African Descent (NdCAD). 


Dr. Derron Wallace 

Derron Wallace is the Florence Kay Levy Fellow in Education and African American Studies at Brandeis University. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Wheaton College (Massachusetts), where he studied sociology and the African diaspora. He received his M.Phil. in Educational Research from the University of Cambridge. He recently earned his Ph.D. in Sociology of Education at the University of Cambridge, where he was a Marshall and Gates Cambridge Scholar. Derron’s research focuses on inequalities and identities of 'race', class and gender in urban schools and neighborhoods. More specifically, his work examines the educational outcomes of working class and middle class Black immigrants in urban public schools in global cities. Derron's most recent study explores the national, political and cultural factors that position Afro-Caribbean youth as 'high achievers' in New York relative to African Americans, and 'underachievers' in London compared to Black Africans.

For a number of years, Derron served as a professional Community Organizer with Citizens UK, the sister alliance of the Industrial Areas Foundation, where he trained hundreds of civil society leaders on the craft of community organizing and worked with an alliance of academic and religious institutions on community safety, immigration reform, youth rights and financial literacy. For the past three years, Derron has worked as a strategic consultant with local educational authorities in London and with nationally recognized non-profit organizations like the Catholic Association for Racial Justice and The Posse Foundation on program development and evaluation.

Derron brings to the Faculty Fellow post strong interests in global analyses of urban education, comparative and international perspectives on Black masculinities, and cross-national explorations of middle class parents in inner cities.



Click here to read about our 2012-2014 Faculty Fellows, Dr. Kenna Arbuthnot ('12-'13) and Dr. Limarys Caraballo ('12-'14), as well as watch their keynote presentations.

Click here to read about our 2011-2012 Faculty Fellows, Dr. David Wall Rice and Dr. Maisha Winn, as well as watch their keynote presentations.

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