Institute for Urban and Minority Education
Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College
Columbia University

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A Historic Evening at the Inaugural Edmund Gordon Lecture

On October 10th, IUME, in co-sponsorship with the Program in History and Education, hosted Professor Charles M. Payne who delivered the Inaugural Edmund Gordon Address at Teachers College in honor of IUME Founder and legendary figure Dr. Edmund Gordon. The address entitled, “Whatever Happened to the Negro Question? Educational Discourse and the Lost Question of Race”, drew a standing-room-only audience of nearly 200 to Milbank Chapel and helped illustrate how historical understanding is crucial for thinking about contemporary school improvement. In his address, Dr. Payne presented a broad critique of the educational community’s modern perceptions and attitudes towards school achievement, poverty, and race.

Click here to view the lecture on the IUME YouTube channel and here for pictures.

Introducing the "Educating Harlem" Lecture Series

In collaboration with the Program in History and Education at Teachers College as well as the Center on History and Education, IUME is excited to announce its participation in the new "Educating Harlem" lecture series, which is part of a larger initiative to better explore the forces that shaped education in Harlem.

On March 27th, the first "Educating Harlem" lecture took place at Teachers College in front of a packed room in Russell Hall, where Dr. Martha Biondi -- Professor of Education at Northwestern University -- spoke about her research on youth revolutions at City College in the 1960s. Our next speaker will be Dr. Khalil Muhammad, who is currently the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research and Black Culture. For more information about the Education Harlem initiative, click here.

Subcribe to the new IUME Newsletter!

In October, IUME redesigned its monthly newsletter in a way that not only increases dissemination, but most importantly, better shares all the events and news with the world. The newsletter is available in PDF format, but also available via hard copy at the IUME office at Teachers College. Make sure to subscribe to the newsletter and e-mail list on the bottom right-hand side of this IUME homepage.

For more information and to download/view past IUME newsletters, click here.

Learn More About IUME's Literacy Teachers Initiative (LTI) Project

 IUME was excited to announce the launch of the Literacy Teachers Initiative (LTI) Project in spring, 2012. Since then, we have partnered with dynamic elementary and middle school teachers from Harlem and Brooklyn in an effort to collaboratively work toward finding increased pedagogical methods for students. The LTI Project is led by Dr. Jodene Morrell of Teachers College. We have grown in number and ideas each year, received competitive research grants, presented at Teachers College and state, national, and international conferences, and written for publication.

Check out our LTI page for more information and check out the biographies of the Teacher Fellows here!

Learn More about the Youth Historians in Harlem Program!

The Youth Historians in Harlem (YHH) project, sponsored by IUME, is a new critical approach to teaching history in urban schools in Harlem, focusing on empowering minority youth through their own cultural experiences, involving students in the practice of "doing" history through guided projects, programs, and participatory action research. YHH seeks to increase students' interest in history through innovative and engaging pedagogical approaches that help them become historians, researching the rich historical past of ‘their’ Harlem community. While YHIH seeks to advance the historical knowledge of education in Harlem, above all, our project seeks to make history relevant to urban students and help increase academic achievement. To learn more about this exciting project, visit the official website here.

Getting Real III Public Videoconference Series Recap

This past fall over the span of 16 weeks, IUME partnered with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and New York University Hip-Hop Education Center to launch an innovative online seminar series called Getting Real III. Seminal scholars and leaders in the growing field of Hip-Hop studies focused their attention on how Hip-Hop culture, culturally relevant pedagogy and youth participatory action research can successfully be used to close the education gap in America's public schools.

This online public videoconference series was highly successful. The final four lectures were at Teachers College, and can be viewed in full HERE -- so check them out! The TC speakers featured Professor Chris Emdin, Professor Ernest Morrell, Jen Johnson, and Sam Seidel with Dave "TC" Ellis. (Original lineup here.)

Recapping the Final IUME Colloquia of 2012 on "Ill Literacies"

IUME's last Colloquia at the Gordon Campus was spearheaded by two dynamic scholars--Crystal Belle and Jamila Lyiscott--who are both Research Fellows at IUME and Ph.D. students in English Education. Both Crystal and Jamila, versed in spoken word and literacy experts in the making, discussed critical issues in literacy as it applies to democracy and freedom inside schools. We had a full house at the Gordon Campus, and it was a wonderful way to reflect on 2012 with critical discussion and passionate performances from both Crystal and Jamila.

The Colloquium is viewable in full on our YouTube channel and also don't forget to view our photo gallery, too! (For original information and details, click here.)


Subscribe to our IUME YouTube Channel!

Have you visited the official IUME YouTube page recently? Want to learn more about IUME? Make sure to stop by our YouTube page here and watch a few of our videos and subscribe!. Not only do we keep a collection of IUME events and Colloquia, but our video team prepares short clips on critical research. The most recent Beyond Bullying presentation is now available, as is our December Colloquium and other great clips that should be shared!

In our increasingly digital and mutlimodal era, we believe strongly in collaborative educational content, so make sure to check back often and subscribe to your channel.


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Announcements > IUME Director Ernest Morrell featured in English Literacy Blog

IUME Director Ernest Morrell featured in English Literacy Blog

IUME Director Ernest Morrell was featured in a well-visited national blog, entitled SmartBlog for Education, which is also featured in the National Council for Literacy Education (NCLE) SmartBrief. To view the original article, click here, or read the transcript below.


 

Ernest Morrell, director of the Institute for Urban and Minority Education at Teachers College Columbia University, is a leading voice in literacy and English education. In this interview with SmartBrief education editor Trigie Ealey, he offers his take on the state of literacy, technology, and collaboration as teachers and students across the country head back to school.

What is digital literacy education and how does it translate to the classroom?

The world is changing quickly. The available communications tools at our disposal have changed what it means to be literate. We have a generation of youth that is saturated with information and we also have a generation of sophisticated information producers. A digital literacy education will help our youth to become better consumers and producers of information in the digital age. We need to allow our students to produce and distribute information multimodally in classrooms. This includes adding blogs, wikis, PowerPoint slides, and digital videos to the usual class essays. It also means that we have to teach students to “read” media such as magazine covers, songs, films, television shows, and Internet sites. Our youth are forming views of themselves and the world based on information they receive via the media so literacy educators have to help them understand how to decode and deconstruct these messages. Finally, in the age of Google and Wikipedia, all of us are using the Internet as a research tool so part of our responsibility entails helping students to use the Internet more systematically and ethically in their academic research.

What is one current education issue that you predict will be a game changer for the future of  literacy education in America’s schools? Why?

Without a doubt, it’s educational policies that negatively impact the morale of the profession. Nothing matters more to the future of education than recruiting and retaining good teachers, and if we continue our public assault on teachers, I am concerned that it will be difficult to convince the best and brightest of our youth that teaching is a career that they should pursue. Teachers need resources, support, and praise, and we need to be doing everything we can to bolster our current generation of educators while we aggressively reach out to prospective teachers on our college and university campuses. I would love to see a national campaign to recruit the next generation of literacy teachers, and I would like to see more balanced reporting that also focuses on the outstanding literacy instruction that occurs in countless classrooms across the country every day.

Why is it so important for teachers to collaborate with other teachers?

I see collaborative inquiry as essential to the future of the discipline. When teachers are able to plan together, to ask hard questions of their practice, and when they can collect and share information about their successes, the profession grows and teaching improves. The answers to most of our pressing questions are in the classrooms, and no group is better positioned to provide those answers than our practicing teachers. I am excited about NCLE’s Centers for Literacy Education because they provide a forum for teachers to work together at their school sites and to share their journeys with colleagues across the nation. It was for this very purpose that NCTE was founded [more than]100 years ago.

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