Institute for Urban and Minority Education
Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College
Columbia University

Skip to navigation menu

Skip to main content


A Historic Evening at the Inaugural Edmund Gordon Lecture

On October 10th, IUME, in co-sponsorship with the Program in History and Education, hosted Professor Charles M. Payne who delivered the Inaugural Edmund Gordon Address at Teachers College in honor of IUME Founder and legendary figure Dr. Edmund Gordon. The address entitled, “Whatever Happened to the Negro Question? Educational Discourse and the Lost Question of Race”, drew a standing-room-only audience of nearly 200 to Milbank Chapel and helped illustrate how historical understanding is crucial for thinking about contemporary school improvement. In his address, Dr. Payne presented a broad critique of the educational community’s modern perceptions and attitudes towards school achievement, poverty, and race.

Click here to view the lecture on the IUME YouTube channel and here for pictures.

Introducing the "Educating Harlem" Lecture Series

In collaboration with the Program in History and Education at Teachers College as well as the Center on History and Education, IUME is excited to announce its participation in the new "Educating Harlem" lecture series, which is part of a larger initiative to better explore the forces that shaped education in Harlem.

On March 27th, the first "Educating Harlem" lecture took place at Teachers College in front of a packed room in Russell Hall, where Dr. Martha Biondi -- Professor of Education at Northwestern University -- spoke about her research on youth revolutions at City College in the 1960s. Our next speaker will be Dr. Khalil Muhammad, who is currently the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research and Black Culture. For more information about the Education Harlem initiative, click here.

Subcribe to the new IUME Newsletter!

In October, IUME redesigned its monthly newsletter in a way that not only increases dissemination, but most importantly, better shares all the events and news with the world. The newsletter is available in PDF format, but also available via hard copy at the IUME office at Teachers College. Make sure to subscribe to the newsletter and e-mail list on the bottom right-hand side of this IUME homepage.

For more information and to download/view past IUME newsletters, click here.

Learn More About IUME's Literacy Teachers Initiative (LTI) Project

 IUME was excited to announce the launch of the Literacy Teachers Initiative (LTI) Project in spring, 2012. Since then, we have partnered with dynamic elementary and middle school teachers from Harlem and Brooklyn in an effort to collaboratively work toward finding increased pedagogical methods for students. The LTI Project is led by Dr. Jodene Morrell of Teachers College. We have grown in number and ideas each year, received competitive research grants, presented at Teachers College and state, national, and international conferences, and written for publication.

Check out our LTI page for more information and check out the biographies of the Teacher Fellows here!

Learn More about the Youth Historians in Harlem Program!

The Youth Historians in Harlem (YHH) project, sponsored by IUME, is a new critical approach to teaching history in urban schools in Harlem, focusing on empowering minority youth through their own cultural experiences, involving students in the practice of "doing" history through guided projects, programs, and participatory action research. YHH seeks to increase students' interest in history through innovative and engaging pedagogical approaches that help them become historians, researching the rich historical past of ‘their’ Harlem community. While YHIH seeks to advance the historical knowledge of education in Harlem, above all, our project seeks to make history relevant to urban students and help increase academic achievement. To learn more about this exciting project, visit the official website here.

Getting Real III Public Videoconference Series Recap

This past fall over the span of 16 weeks, IUME partnered with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and New York University Hip-Hop Education Center to launch an innovative online seminar series called Getting Real III. Seminal scholars and leaders in the growing field of Hip-Hop studies focused their attention on how Hip-Hop culture, culturally relevant pedagogy and youth participatory action research can successfully be used to close the education gap in America's public schools.

This online public videoconference series was highly successful. The final four lectures were at Teachers College, and can be viewed in full HERE -- so check them out! The TC speakers featured Professor Chris Emdin, Professor Ernest Morrell, Jen Johnson, and Sam Seidel with Dave "TC" Ellis. (Original lineup here.)

Recapping the Final IUME Colloquia of 2012 on "Ill Literacies"

IUME's last Colloquia at the Gordon Campus was spearheaded by two dynamic scholars--Crystal Belle and Jamila Lyiscott--who are both Research Fellows at IUME and Ph.D. students in English Education. Both Crystal and Jamila, versed in spoken word and literacy experts in the making, discussed critical issues in literacy as it applies to democracy and freedom inside schools. We had a full house at the Gordon Campus, and it was a wonderful way to reflect on 2012 with critical discussion and passionate performances from both Crystal and Jamila.

The Colloquium is viewable in full on our YouTube channel and also don't forget to view our photo gallery, too! (For original information and details, click here.)


Subscribe to our IUME YouTube Channel!

Have you visited the official IUME YouTube page recently? Want to learn more about IUME? Make sure to stop by our YouTube page here and watch a few of our videos and subscribe!. Not only do we keep a collection of IUME events and Colloquia, but our video team prepares short clips on critical research. The most recent Beyond Bullying presentation is now available, as is our December Colloquium and other great clips that should be shared!

In our increasingly digital and mutlimodal era, we believe strongly in collaborative educational content, so make sure to check back often and subscribe to your channel.


Upcoming Events


Announcements > Edmund Gordon Honored with John Hope Franklin Award

Edmund Gordon Honored with John Hope Franklin Award

Two of America’s most influential advocates for improving the life outcomes of children from underprivileged backgrounds were honored on March 7th during an awards ceremony meant to recognize their lifetime achievements.

Diverse Issues in Higher Education  presented its distinguished John Hope Franklin Award to Dr. Edmund Gordon, a longtime research scientist, a prolific writer on the subject of academic achievement and educational equity and an original architect of the federally funded Head Start program; and Marian Wright Edelman, founder and longtime leader of the Children’s Defense Fund, a national organization that has for decades pushed for policies that improve the quality of life for the nation’s poorest children.
This is the seventh year that Diverse has presented the John Hope Franklin Award, and the first year the award presentation has been incorporated into the annual meeting of the American Council on Education in Washington, D.C.
 
Maya Minter, Diverse’s  vice president of editorial and production, says both Gordon and Edelman embody the principles of the award’s namesake, a noted historian who played a critical role in creating the framework for Brown v. Board of Education.
 
Minter says the late Franklin would have found nothing more encouraging than for the education community to come together to see both Edmund and Edelman receive the award named in his honor.
 
Of Gordon, Minter says,  “He and Dr. Franklin represent the very essence of intellectual excellence and integrity in research and scholarship.”
 
Minter describes Edelman’s Children’s Defense Fund as “the most powerful voice ever created for the millions of poor children in the United States.”
 
Indeed, both Gordon’s and Edelman’s advocacy on behalf of poor and minority children has defined a significant challenge of the 21st century, which is to improve the life quality and life chances of such children ensure the nation’s future.
 
Gordon has done this through research and scholarship, while Edelman has focused on policy. Both of their contributions have pushed higher education to tackle the issues of K-12 education and child welfare more aggressively than would likely have otherwise been the case.
 
Gordon holds a series of distinguished academic posts, including director of the Institute for Minority and Urban Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is also currently working alongside Educational Testing Service senior researcher Dr. Michael Nettles on a project that deals with what educational tests and assessments will look like in the coming years.

The project, known as the Gordon Commission on the Future of Assessment, is just one of several projects that will build upon a monumental legacy that includes helping to design and launch Head Start — the nation’s longstanding federally funded pre-school program for disadvantaged youth

“[Head Start] has made enormous contributions to not just the academic health, but the physical and mental health of millions of people in the country,” Nettles says. “And now, here we are half a century later and people are establishing pre-school as the foundation for closing the achievement gap.”

Interestingly, Head Start is one of the many programs Edelman has fought for at the helm of the Children’s Defense Fund, says Minter. The CDF also supports programs providing health care, immunizations, nutritious food and educational opportunities for poor children and their families.

Dr. Johnnetta Cole, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and a past John Hope Franklin award recipient, called Edelman an “amazing and grace-filled champion for all of our children.”

“Observing and supporting her efforts in the interest of every child, and serving as the president of her alma mater, Spelman College, are among the great joys and privileges in my life,” Cole says. “It will be a great event when my heroine, Marian Wright Edelman, receives an award that bears the name of my hero, John Hope Franklin.”

This year’s award was presented at the 93rd annual ACE conference at the Washington Hilton Hotel.

Past recipients of the award include: Dr. Clifton Wharton, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Dr. Maya Angelou, and Dr. William Friday.

 
Return to Top